Lionel Shriver on things that possess their owners

Lionel Shriver on things that possess their owners

Property: Stories Between Two Novellas. By Lionel Shriver. Harper; 336 pages; $26.99. The Borough Press; £14.99 LIONEL SHRIVER’s literary currency is hard, topical fiction. Her 12 novels range—controversially—from school shootings and the Northern Irish Troubles to immigration, demography, terrorism, the American healthcare system, obesity and, most recently, finance. (She is also a former contributor to The Economist.)…

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Video-game consoles get a wooden dimension

Video-game consoles get a wooden dimension

IN THE past 20 years Nintendo, a gaming-console company, has endured the sort of ups and downs associated with Mario, its beloved jumping plumber. A decade ago it briefly leapt above its main competitors, Microsoft and Sony, thanks to the success of the Wii. The platform was typical of Nintendo’s efforts to appeal to a…

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Hope I save before I get old

Hope I save before I get old

IF YOU reach the age of 65 in the OECD, you can expect to live for another 19 years  or so (more if you are a woman, less if you are a man). If you stop work earlier than 65, and live a bit longer than average, you could easily be retired for 25-30 years,…

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Beyond the tyranny of tolerance

Beyond the tyranny of tolerance

IN 2012 a same-sex couple sued a bakery in Colorado for discrimination after the owner, a Christian man who believed that gay marriage is “sacrilegious”, refused to bake them a wedding cake. The owner is making his case to the Supreme Court on the grounds of freedom of expression and freedom of conscience. In 2016…

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Riots threaten Nicaragua’s autocratic president

Riots threaten Nicaragua’s autocratic president

AMONG Latin America’s handful of autocracies, that of Daniel Ortega in Nicaragua once stood out for its stability. Mr Ortega was the most prominent leader of the revolutionary Sandinista regime of the 1980s, but lost an election in 1990. He later forged a dirty deal with a conservative rival that let him return to power…

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North Korea’s despot has one goal: survival

North Korea’s despot has one goal: survival

ADMIT it. The world’s commentators, Banyan included, have underestimated North Korea’s leader. Kim Jong Un was preparing this week to meet South Korea’s president, Moon Jae-in, on the southern side of the demilitarised zone between their two countries, on April 27th, just after The Economist went to press. Even six months ago, no one imagined…

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Big tech is growing, but so is investors’ caution

Big tech is growing, but so is investors’ caution

FOR a few years now Facebook, Amazon, Netflix and Google have behaved like sled dogs pulling the stockmarket forward with boundless energy. The ride has been mostly smooth and enriching. To many in Silicon Valley the fortunes of the FANGs—as the pack is known—seemed so entwined that they were treated like a distinct asset class.…

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When Tuareg music and rock’n’roll collide

When Tuareg music and rock’n’roll collide

LOVERS of live music in Tamanrassat, a mountainous city in Southern Algeria, need look no further than a wedding for their fix. They are where most local bands make their name, according to Iyad Moussa Ben Abderahmane, the lead singer of Imarhan, a six-member group that grew up there. The celebratory audience might not be…

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The Economist asks: Is the military swaying Pakistan in the wrong direction? | The Economist asks on acast

The Economist asks: Is the military swaying Pakistan in the wrong direction? | The Economist asks on acast

We talk to Imran Khan, star cricketer turned politician bidding to lead Pakistan in the upcoming election. Topics include Donald Trump and the war on terror, why Pakistani media is under pressure and the full-face veil – women’s choice or imposition? Hosted by Anne McElvoy and Edward McBride, our Asia Editor. Music by Chris Zabriskie “Divider”…

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