The challenges of defining death

The challenges of defining death

WHEN did Shalom Ouanounou die? A court in Ontario must decide. The 25-year-old Canadian’s doctors say September, at which point they assessed that Ouanounou was brain dead after a severe asthma attack, and incapable of breathing without the assistance of a ventilator. His family, though, say he died five months later, in March, when his…

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Under the surface of Eisenhower’s era

Under the surface of Eisenhower’s era

The Age of Eisenhower: America and the World in the 1950s. By William Hitchcock. Simon & Schuster; 672 pages; $35 Eisenhower vs. Warren: The Battle for Civil Rights and Liberties. By James F. Simon. Liveright; 448 pages; $35 Get our daily newsletterUpgrade your inbox and get our Daily Dispatch and Editor’s Picks. MANY Americans, especially…

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Gun politics after Parkland

Gun politics after Parkland

IN THE months since a teenage gunman slaughtered 17 people at Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida in February, a student-led campaign has organised two mass walkouts from schools and country-wide demonstrations. On May 4th, President Donald Trump and Mike Pence, the vice-president, will appear at the National Rifle Association’s annual convention in Dallas—suggesting…

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Environmentalist art before there was an “environment”

Environmentalist art before there was an “environment”

TWO centuries ago Thomas Cole arrived on American shores, bringing with him from England a new landscape painting tradition perfect for the wild expanses of the new world. Cole also brought a zeal for warning about the perils that unchecked industry posed to the natural world, establishing one of painting’s first environmental critiques. “Atlantic Crossings”,…

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Regulating the tech titans

Regulating the tech titans

Andrew’s opening argument, is, of course, both articulate and passionate.  It appeals brilliantly to revved up emotions that have largely taken over, for now, the intentionally-deliberative process of democratic lawmaking. But as several readers point out, Andrew isn’t advocating for any specific rules–let alone “heavy” regulations–that can be evaluated using the tools of legal and…

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The world’s first neighbourhood built “from the internet up”

The world’s first neighbourhood built “from the internet up”

QUAYSIDE, a 12-acre (4.8-hectare) stretch of flood-prone land on Toronto’s eastern waterfront, is home to a vast, pothole-filled parking lot, low-slung buildings and huge soyabean silos—a crumbling vestige of the area’s bygone days as an industrial port. Many consider it an eyesore but for Sidewalk Labs, an “urban innovation” subsidiary of Google’s parent company, Alphabet,…

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Why Wembley might be sold

Why Wembley might be sold

The Stanley Matthews FA Cup Final of 1953. England’s victory in the 1966 World Cup. England’s performances in the European Championship of 1996 and the feeling of national renewal they engendered. These are among the defining moments in English football history. The link between them is their location: Wembley stadium. The old ground and its…

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